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Song Premiere: The Sword Headbang in 'Veil of Isis'

Texas metal outfit channels ancient gods

The Sword
Courtesy of Razor & Tie
September 25, 2012 9:00 AM ET

Click to listen to The Sword's 'Veil of Isis'

Austin heavy metal outfit the Sword are set to follow up 2010's Warp Riders with their new record Apocryphon (Razor & Tie), out October 22nd. Now you can get a taste of the album with this fresh headbanger, "Veil of Isis."

Frontman J.D. Cronise calls the track the most "Sword-ish" song of the album musically, yet notes that lyrically, "it's a little more metaphysical than a lot of our previous stuff. It talks a lot about cycles of nature and life and death and birth and transformation and death and rebirth.

"In essence, the song is about change," Cronise tells Rolling Stone. "[It's about] moving from one phase of the natural cycle to the next and the recognition of the knowledge revealed when such transitions occur. The lyrics make reference to Isis, the goddess of nature and magic, and her brother/husband Osiris, the god of the dead and the afterlife, as agents of those changes and keepers of sacred knowledge. The 'veil' is that which hides from us the true nature of the universe that, during our earthly existence, is largely hidden from us."

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