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Song Premiere: Ryan Bingham, 'Guess Who’s Knocking'

Americana singer snarls and shouts on gritty new track

September 6, 2012 8:00 AM ET
ryan bingham
Ryan Bingham
Anna Axster

Click to listen to Ryan Bingham's 'Guess Who's Knockin'

Ryan Bingham is not messing around. On his new track "Guess Who's Knocking," the Americana singer-songwriter snarls, "Guess who's knocking on the door?/ It's me motherfucker, I'm knocking on the door," with startling conviction. Heavy, jagged guitars crash over Bingham's gruff shouts as rugged riffs soar and weave over the rambling percussion. Bingham had been stewing on the track for a while, but the bold lyrics came instantaneously. "I had this melody in my head for over a year but never wrote any lyrics for it," says Bingham. "One day during a break in the studio the words just came out as I was playing the riff on the guitar. And all of a sudden the song was there."

"Guess Who's Knocking" is on Bingham's upcoming album Tomorrowland, out September 18th. He'll kick off a North American tour on September 25th in San Francisco, Calif. For full dates, visit Ryan Bingham's website.

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