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Song Premiere: David Bromberg, 'Nobody's Fault But Mine'

Raw take on a gospel traditional

July 31, 2013 9:00 AM ET
David Bromberg
David Bromberg
Jim McGuire

David Bromberg's storied career has included collaborations with some of the biggest names in music – Bob Dylan, George Harrison and Jerry Garcia, just to name a few. On September 24th he'll add another LP to his solo discography, Only Slightly Mad. Now you can take an exclusive first listen to album cut, "Nobody's Fault But Mine," a traditional gospel number that Bromberg's turned into a mid-tempo blues wailer marked by saintly but somber organ work from Brian Mitchell and Bromberg's voice, which runs as ragged as his guitar.

"I've heard this song sung in churches in Manhattan, the Bronx, and Queens as well as in other parts of the country," Bromberg says. "I think you can probably find it anywhere in the U.S. I love this song, and recorded a version of it on a Fantasy album in the late Seventies. The band and I started to perform it again recently without referencing the Seventies version, and it became my favorite tune to perform. Brian Mitchell plays beautifully on this. This version is rawer and sincere. The song speaks to me and for me."

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