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Song Premiere: Citizen Cope, 'One Lovely Day'

Singer features a live string quartet on his new single

Citizen Cope
Danny Clinch
July 16, 2012 10:00 AM ET

Click to listen to Citizen Cope's 'One Lovely Day'

After years of exclusively playing the song live, Citizen Cope has finally layed down this track for fans to listen to in the privacy of their own homes. Though Clarence Greenwood, the singer-songwriter behind the stage name, has performed "One Lovely Day" since 2010, here he gives it a new layer of depth with a live string quartet – a novelty in his 19-year career.  

There was a chance that the song wouldn't even be released under Citizen Cope's name – as he reveals to Rolling Stone, "I originally wanted Chuck Brown to sing it." The song holds profound meaning for the singer, which is apparent in his heartfelt, blues-tinged crooning of the melody. Accompanied by an acoustic guitar, simple percussion, a piano and strings, Greenwood's words have an effortless, maybe even whimsical feel as he sings, "Together we could walk to the river/ Stand with the families/ Move to the sound of the band from Atlantis/ One lovely day. " The singer describes the song as "a hopeful song for those going through trouble, 'cause I know there's a lot of trouble going on in the world right now."

Citizen Cope is currently on tour through the fall in support of his new album, One Lovely Day, which will be released July 17th.

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