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Snoop Dogg Writes Song for Prince William's Bachelor Party

Snoop calls 'Wet' 'the perfect anthem for Prince William or any playa to get the club smokin''

December 1, 2010 12:39 PM ET

As promised, Snoop Dogg released a new song called "Wet" on Tuesday in honor of Prince William's upcoming wedding. In the tune, a heavily Autotuned Snoop delivers some characteristically sexed-up lyrics that don't mention William or the wedding directly — but are certainly appropriate for a strip club or a bachelor party.

Snoop said of the song, "When I heard the royal family wanted to have me perform in celebration of Prince William's marriage, I knew I had to give them a little something. 'Wet' is the perfect anthem for Prince William or any playa to get the club smokin'."

He also tweeted on Wednesday, "UK twizzles, just heard BBC Radio 1 gonna be playing tha new single #WET soon!! Tune in! This song is tha one for Prince William's stag do!"

Photos: Random Notes

Prince Harry wants Snoop and British rapper Tinie Tempah to perform at William's bachelor party, according to British tabloid The Mirror .

"Wet" is slated to appear on Snoop's next LP, Doggumentary Music.

New Music: Snoop Dogg "Wet" [RapRadar]

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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