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Sneak Peeks: "Johnny Cash's America" and "At Folsom Prison"

October 9, 2008 4:02 PM ET

Johnny Cash's life is explored a new in a documentary that will air on the Bio Channel on October 23rd at 9 p.m. ET/10 p.m. PT. Johnny Cash's America will also screen at the Country Music Hall of Fame, the American Cinematheque in Hollywood, the Memphis Indie Film Festival and the Paley Center in New York throughout October before coming to CD/DVD on October 28th. The film features interviews with Bob Dylan, John Mellencamp, Snoop Dogg and Al Gore, among others, and includes 27 Cash songs and some never-before-seen footage of Cash's 1965 TV show and sessions with Dylan. Click above for a clip of Vince Gill musing on the different kinds of artists Cash brought together.

Next week also sees the release of Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison: Legacy Edition, a deluxe box set version of Cash's most famous performance. The package comes with a DVD documentary about the show, which features interviews with band members and former Folsom inmates. "The pictures taken weren't exaggerated," explains Cash bassist Marshall Grant. "There was no joy in that prison." Follow the jump for a teaser.

Related Stories:
Roseanne Cash Says Johnny Wouldn't Have Supported McCain
Johnny Cash's Folsom Prison Show Getting Deluxe Treatment
The Immortals: Johnny Cash

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Song Stories

“Try a Little Tenderness”

Otis Redding | 1966

This pop standard had been previously recorded by dozens of artists, including by Bing Crosby 33 years before Otis Redding, who usually wrote his own songs, cut it. It was actually Sam Cooke’s 1964 take, which Redding’s manager played for Otis, that inspired the initially reluctant singer to take on the song. Isaac Hayes, then working as Stax Records’ in-house producer, handled the arrangement, and Booker T. and the MG’s were the backing band. Redding’s soulful version begins quite slowly and tenderly itself before mounting into a rousing, almost religious “You’ve gotta hold her, squeeze her …” climax. “I did that damn song you told me to do,” Redding told his manager. “It’s a brand new song now.”

More Song Stories entries »
 
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