Slipknot Slam North Carolina's 'Bathroom Bill' Ahead of Charlotte Concert

"We don't care where you pee – just please flush. It's pretty simple, really," band says in statement

A day before Slipknot's Charlotte concert, the band issued a statement criticizing North Carolina's controversial HB2 "bathroom bill." Credit: Epsilon/Getty Images Entertainment

A day before Slipknot's August 2nd concert at Charlotte, North Carolina's PNC Music Pavilion, the band issued a statement criticizing the state's controversial HB2 "bathroom bill." Slipknot also explained why they proceeded with the Charlotte show even though so many of their fellow rockers canceled gigs in the Tar Heel State.

"When we started this tour, we had reservations about playing in North Carolina because of a law recently passed there called HB2," the band explained. "The law halts the rights of LGBTQ people, doesn’t allow for cities to pass a living wage for the working class. We believe that regardless of who you are, or what you believe in this country – and in our own metal community – that everyone should be given access to equal opportunities they need to succeed. This law flies in the face of those values."

While artists like Bruce Springsteen, Pearl Jam, Ringo Starr, Maroon 5, Demi Lovato and Nick Jonas and many more have canceled North Carolina concerts in the wake of HB2, Slipknot felt they'd make a bigger impact toward repealing the law by performing Tuesday night.

"We believe that regardless of who you are, or who you love, you shouldn't have to face hatred at home or in your community. Our fans in North Carolina deserve better, so we decided not to cancel," the band added. "We don't care where you pee – just please flush. It's pretty simple, really."

To help bring an end to HB2, Slipknot announced that, for the Charlotte show, they've partnered with LGBTQ advocacy group Equality NC to encourage concertgoers to get involved with the effort to repeal the law as well as help fans register to vote, presumably for politicians who are against the controversial bill.

"We're coming to North Carolina to show our fans that they can make the difference needed to repeal this law and return their state to a place that welcomes everyone and values differences," the band said.

Charlotte was also scheduled to host the 2017 NBA All-Star Game, but the league pulled the game over the state's refusal to repeal HB2.