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Slash Reveals That Velvet Revolver Is Playing Again

After a long hiatus, the band is 'jamming' and testing out new singers

October 12, 2010 5:23 PM ET

Two-and-a-half years after Velvet Revolver split with singer Scott Weiland, members Slash, Duff McKagan, Matt Sorum and Dave Kushner are back in the studio and testing out new singers. In August 2009, Slash said that Velvet Revolver was searching for a new singer, but he wound up focusing on his own solo disc, while McKagan briefly joined Jane's Addiction. Now, according to a MySpace update from Slash, Velvet Revolver has reunited.

Video: Slash on his Five Favorite Guitar Solos of All Time

"VR is back together jamming, trying out singers. No updates yet. But it's great to hook up with Duff, Matt & Dave after all this time," Slash wrote. "I'll keep you posted on any interesting developments from those sessions as they happen. The creative juices are definitely flowing. I'm positive something awesome is going to surface soon." Slash's update confirmed what Sorum wrote on his Twitter last month: "Velvet Revolver Jamming in the studio beginning of Oct. Tryin 2 singers. Excited bout that." Prior to the band's hiatus, Alter Bridge's Myles Kennedy and Spacehog vocalist Royston Langdon were among those rumored to fill Weiland's spot.

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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