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Sinead O'Connor Releasing New Album

Recently married singer is streaming two new tracks from 'How About I Be Me (And You Be You)?'

December 12, 2011 12:00 PM ET
Sinead O'Connor
'How About I Be Me (And You Be You)?'
Neil Gavin

It’s a banner week for Sinead O’Connor. Four days after marrying boyfriend Barry Herridge in her "absolute dream wedding ceremony" on her 45th birthday, the singer-songwriter has released two songs from her forthcoming album, How About I Be Me (And You Be You)? (Stream "4th And Vine" and "Take Off Your Shoes" here.)

The record is set for release on February 21, 2012 on the One Little Indian imprint. How About… will feature a cover of "Queen of Denmark" by John Grant (former frontman of the Czars) as well as original material. If the newly proffered tracks are any indication, it will find O’Connor in an autobiographical mood: "4th and Vine"" buoyantly celebrates marriage.

Next year marks the 25th anniversary of O’Connor’s debut album, 1987’s The Lion and the Cobra. The controversial Irish musician is also planning an international tour in support of How About I Be Me…, with dates to be announced shortly.

Related
Sinead O'Connor Getting Married for Fourth Time
Week in Rock History: Sinead O’Connor enrages 'SNL' audiences

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