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Shania Twain to Release Autobiography

Country singer's first book will focus on her rise to fame, divorce from producer Robert "Mutt" Lange

September 22, 2010 6:23 PM ET

Country superstar Shania Twain will release an as-yet-untitled autobiography next spring, tracing her roots from a "painful" upbringing in rural Ontario to her rise to her fame and marriage and eventual divorce from producer Robert "Mutt" Lange. A documentary-type series on Twain will premiere on Oprah Winfrey's OWN network at around the same time to book comes out.

"There have been moments in my life I was concerned by the reality that tomorrow would never come. Recently I experienced one of those moments to an intensity that brought on a sudden urgency to document my life before I ran out of time, before I had the opportunity to share an honest and complete account of my life, in my own words," Twain said in a statement. "There are times in your life that are meant for reflection, and this was one of them. I began writing this book with a sincere respect for the past, present and future as something never to be taken for granted."

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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