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Sex Pistols Bring "Anarchy" To L.A., Threaten To Kill Audience Member

October 26, 2007 1:52 PM ET

The Sex Pistols performed together for the first time in four years last night at a private show at Los Angeles' Roxy Theatre as they prepared for their four-date stand at London's Brixton Academy. An audience of 500 were treated to Sex Pistols classics, performed amid heat and sound problems, and the wine-swilling John Lydon's typical acidic tongue. The Pistols, who have collected together to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of their Never Mind The Bollocks -- Here's The Sex Pistols, played an hour-long set that featured "Anarchy in the U.K.," "Holidays in the Sun," and a version of "Stepping Stone" that contained the lyrics "Paris Hilton, kiss my arse." At one point, a drink thrown in Lydon's direction hit him in the face, causing the cantankerous singer to threaten "to kill the coward" if he caught who lunged a beverage at him. Ah, it's refreshing to know, after thirty years, there's still so much angst.

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