See Arcade Fire Play Unreleased Song, Reflect on Early Days in Clip

Band plays bluesy "Get Right" in 'Reflektor Tapes' excerpt

A clip from the upcoming Arcade Fire documentary The Reflektor Tapes shows the group rehearsing a bluesy, gospel-inflected tune called "Get Right" that they have yet to release officially. "Better get right before you die," frontman Win Butler sings with a little harmony help from his bandmates against a rumbling pentatonic guitar line. A live performance of the full song, recorded in 2013 when the band played Montreal, is streaming online, via DIY. The film excerpt, which arrives via Noisey, also finds Butler and the group's Régine Chassagne reminiscing about the smaller venues they played when the band was just starting out.

Filmmaker Kahlil Joseph, who won a Special Jury Prize at Sundance in 2013 for his trippy Flying Lotus video "Until the Quiet Comes," helmed the documentary. The movie, which chronicles the making of the group's 2013 album Reflektor, will open in theaters on September 23rd. Prior to its wide release, The Reflektor Tapes will be screened at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 12th.

The group has been releasing clips from the film since July. The first showed the band performing in Haiti, where it began working on Reflektor, as well as in front of crowds worldwide on its subsequent tour. A subsequent clip focused on the group recording "Afterlife" with former LCD Soundsystem frontman James Murphy. The group also put out an official trailer for the The Reflektor Tapes that runs a little over a minute, but is packed with footage of the group.

In other Arcade Fire news, Butler and Chassagne announced earlier this year that they planned on opening a Haitian restaurant in Montreal named Agrikol. "It's more of an art project," Butler said at the time. "The idea is that it's a cultural space. The thing that we were really impressed with at [co-owner Jen Agg's restaurant] Rhum Corner is that it's this space for Haitian and Caribbean culture and it's really cool and contemporary."