Scott Weiland 'Embarrassed' by Bad Behavior at Boston Meet and Greet

"I acted like a total asshole," says rocker

Scott Weiland apologized on Facebook for a disastrous VIP meet and greet following a concert in Boston with his band the Wildabouts earlier this month. "I'm embarrassed by my behavior and some of the things that I said," Weiland wrote. "Fans don’t deserve that. Without our fans and supporters, we would not be able to do what we’re doing."

The incident occurred after the singer's March 13th set at Brighton Music Hall. As Consequence of Sound points out, reports of Weiland's bad behavior at the $150 meet and greet originally surfaced on the Stone Temple Pilots message board, Below Empty. Several posts noted that Weiland was initially gregarious, but his mood quickly soured and one person suggested he was drunk at the time. One fan wrote that when it came time to take a picture with the musician, Weiland "put his arm around me and literally said, 'let's get this shit done with.'"

Weiland reportedly told one fan, "Let's suck a dick!" when it was his turn to take a photo, while another — who was told not to mention his two STP tattoos to the rocker — remembered: "I walk up and tell [S]cott something along the lines of, 'I just wanted to tell you I have been a fan for 20 years.' Scott then interrupts me and says something like 'OK, hurry up. I don’t want to hear it.' I stand next to him and smile for my picture…meanwhile, he was complaining the whole five seconds that it was taking too long."

In his belated apology, Weiland ascribed his bad behavior to fatigue from the show itself, though noted that didn't excuse his actions. "I put my all into the show that night and honestly was just beyond exhausted," he wrote. "[E]ither way, I acted like a total asshole and for that I’m truly sorry."

Weiland's Boston show was the last in the initial leg of his tour leading up to the March 30th release of Blaster, his first LP with the Wildabouts. It's also Weiland's first solo album since 2008's "Happy" in Galoshes, which he recently described to Rolling Stone as "an experimental art record for the most part. Blaster is definitely a band sound: a stripped-down, furry sound with a lot of space between the notes. But it's tight and to-the-point while keeping that garage rock vibe to it."