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Scarlett Johansson and Pete Yorn Premiere "Relator" Video

August 13, 2009 9:12 AM ET

"Relator," the first video from Pete Yorn and Scarlett Johansson's collaborative album Break Up (due September 8th), premiered on Yahoo! Music last night. In May, Yorn told Rolling Stone he had a dream that instructed him, " 'I have to make a record inspired by Serge Gainsbourg and Brigitte Bardot.' So who is Brigitte Bardot? And I was like, Scarlett Johansson could be the Brigitte Bardot type. So I reached out to her and she was into it and we did it."

Take a look a more actors with rock-star chops here.

The duo recorded the album in 2006, before Johansson began working on her first album Anywhere I Lay My Head, an LP of Tom Waits covers. "The idea [was] of two people vocalizing their relationship through duets," Johansson told Parade. "I always thought of it as just a small project between friends. It perfectly captured where I was in my life at the time." As Rock Daily reported in January, Johansson covered Jeff Buckley's "Last Goodbye" for the He's Just Not That Into You soundtrack.

Related Stories:
Pete Yorn: "Scarlett Johansson Could Be Brigitte Bardot"
Scarlett Johansson Covers Jeff Buckley For "He's Just Not That Into You" Soundtrack
Scarlett Johansson Ponders Album of Original Tunes or Leonard Cohen Covers

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Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

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