.

Sara Bareilles Claims Her First Number One Album

'Kaleidoscope Heart' a lone bright spot on the 'Billboard 200,' which sets new sales low

September 15, 2010 1:06 PM ET

Sara Bareilles claimed the number one spot on the Billboard 200 as her second album, Kaleidoscope Heart, moved 90,000 copies in its debut week to grab the top spot. Bareilles' first major label album, 2007’s Little Voice, entered the charts at number 45, selling only 16,000 copies, but built to platinum status from there.

Last week's number one album, Disturbed's Asylum, dropped down to fifth place after a 68 percent sales drop from its debut week. Eminem's Recovery moved up one spot to number two, with another 81,000 copies sold; Now 35 and Katy Perry's Teenage Dream came in at three and four. Interpol's self-titled fourth album debuted at number seven, selling 38,000 copies — a precipitous drop from the 73,000 copies their last album, 2007’s Our Love to Admire, sold in its first week.

According to Nielsen SoundScan, album sales totaled just 4.83 million copies this week, beating the record low set on the week ending August 15th this year. Next week, however, the charts are set to rally with big new albums by Linkin Park, Weezer and Trey Songz.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com