.

Russell Simmons Signs Deal With HBO

Hip-hop mogul turns to home of 'Def Comedy Jam'

May 24, 2013 8:30 AM ET
Russell Simmons
Russell Simmons
Jeff Vespa/Getty Images for The Weinstein Company

Russell Simmons is reuniting with HBO: the hip-hop mogul has signed a two-year development deal with the cable channel that was home to Simmons' Def Comedy Jam, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Simmons will create and develop projects for HBO.

Russell Simmons Gives Rolling Stone Readers Financial Advice

Produced by Simmons, Def Comedy Jam ran on HBO from 1992-97 and 2006-08. The show helped give early exposure to comedians including Dave Chappelle, Bernie Mac, Cedric the Entertainer and Chris Tucker. Simmons has also produced stand-up comedy series for Comedy Central and was an executive producer on the MTV shows Daddy's Girls and Run's House. 

Simmons helped build Def Jam Recordings into a musical powerhouse with co-founder Rick Rubin, and the label released influential music from the Beastie Boys, LL Cool J, Public Enemy and Slayer. Simmons is also an author: he published his most recent book, Super Rich: A Guide to Having It All, in 2011.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com