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Rude Boy Becomes Rihanna's Best-Charting Single Since "Umbrella"

April 2, 2010 12:17 PM ET

For the third straight week, Rihanna's "Rude Boy" has the Number One spot on the Billboard Hot 100 on lockdown. The "Rude Boy" run atop the chart has been Rihanna's most successful since "Umbrella" spent seven consecutive weeks at Number One in early 2007. Coming in at Number Two, as it did last week, was "Nothin' On You" by B.o.B., who Rolling Stone called the Best Stoner MC in our recent Best New Bands 2010 feature. Train's "Hey, Soul Sister" ascended from Number Seven to a new high, Number Three, in its 26th week on the charts.

Justin Bieber, who topped the Billboard 200 album chart this week with My World 2.0, was also a big story on the Hot 100, landing three singles on the chart: "Baby" with Ludacris at Number Eight, the week's highest debut "Eenie Meenie" at Number 30 and "That Should Be Me" at Number 92. The teenage hit machine has now placed five singles from his new My World 2.0 on the Hot 100, putting him well on his way of eclipsing the seven Hot 100 singles My World produced.

T-Pain's "Reverse Cowgirl" was the Hot 100's second-highest debut at Number 75, followed by Young Money's "Roger That" at 86 and, further down, Timbaland and Katy Perry's "If We Ever Meet Again" at 96.

Related Stories:

Rihanna's "Rude Boy" Scores Second Straight Number One


Black Eyed Peas' "Imma Be" Racks Up Second Week at Number One
Black Eyed Peas' "Imma Be" Knocks Ke$ha's "TiK ToK" Out of Hot 100 Number One

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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