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Rouse Readies "Nashville"

Singer-songwriter sticks to his guns on fifth album

December 15, 2004 12:00 AM ET
Josh Rouse will release his fifth album, Nashville, next March. Named for Nebraska-born Rouse's adopted hometown (where the set was crafted), the upcoming disc was recorded by Brad Jones, who also produced the singer-songwriter's acclaimed 2003 disc, 1972.

Rouse is proud of the simplicity of the record's sound. "It's the sound of a band in a room, and it's quite nice, actually," he says. And while other artists are clamoring to claim new territory, Rouse is happy to mine the same terrain, acknowledging similarities between the new record and its predecessor. "It's exactly the same," he says with perfect confidence. "Why would we change anything?"

Tracks will include "It's the Nighttime," which Rouse calls "a hooky tune with pedal steel and Fleetwood Mac keyboards," and "Winter in the Hamptons," which Rouse cites as "Smiths-ish, with more hooks." But the artist counts "My Love Has Gone" as his pick of the new set. "It's my favorite," he confesses. "It just has a great swing."

Rouse will launch a stateside tour in support of Nashville next spring, before heading to Europe.

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