.

Rolling Stones to Reissue Three Albums on Clear Vinyl

Remastered versions of 'Beggars Banquet,' 'Let It Bleed,' 'Hot Rocks 1964-1971' arrive later this month

May 15, 2013 10:15 AM ET
The Rolling Stones, 'Beggars Banquet,' 'Hot Rocks 1964-1971' and 'Let It Bleed'
The Rolling Stones, 'Beggars Banquet,' 'Hot Rocks 1964-1971' and 'Let It Bleed'
Courtesy of ABKCO Records

As the Rolling Stones roll on with their "50 and Counting" tour, fans will get a chance to own three of the band's classic albums on clear vinyl later this month. ABKCO is readying remastered versions of 1968's Beggars Banquet, 1969's Let It Bleed and the 1971 double-LP hits collection Hot Rocks 1964–1971 – all on 180-gram clear vinyl.

Love and War Inside the Rolling Stones

The reissues – the first in a planned ABKCO series called "The Rolling Stones Clearly Classic" – showcase the artistic heights the band reached in the late Sixties and early Seventies. Beggars Banquet, featuring classics like "Street Fighting Man" and "Sympathy for the Devil," was the Stones' last full album with founding guitarist Brian Jones; the following year, Let It Bleed introduced his successor, Mick Taylor, along with tunes including "Gimme Shelter" and "You Can't Always Get What You Want."

The Rolling Stones' "50 and Counting" tour continues tonight at the Honda Center in Anaheim, California.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Bird on a Wire”

Leonard Cohen | 1969

While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com