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Rolling Stones to Reissue Three Albums on Clear Vinyl

Remastered versions of 'Beggars Banquet,' 'Let It Bleed,' 'Hot Rocks 1964-1971' arrive later this month

May 15, 2013 10:15 AM ET
The Rolling Stones, 'Beggars Banquet,' 'Hot Rocks 1964-1971' and 'Let It Bleed'
The Rolling Stones, 'Beggars Banquet,' 'Hot Rocks 1964-1971' and 'Let It Bleed'
Courtesy of ABKCO Records

As the Rolling Stones roll on with their "50 and Counting" tour, fans will get a chance to own three of the band's classic albums on clear vinyl later this month. ABKCO is readying remastered versions of 1968's Beggars Banquet, 1969's Let It Bleed and the 1971 double-LP hits collection Hot Rocks 1964–1971 – all on 180-gram clear vinyl.

Love and War Inside the Rolling Stones

The reissues – the first in a planned ABKCO series called "The Rolling Stones Clearly Classic" – showcase the artistic heights the band reached in the late Sixties and early Seventies. Beggars Banquet, featuring classics like "Street Fighting Man" and "Sympathy for the Devil," was the Stones' last full album with founding guitarist Brian Jones; the following year, Let It Bleed introduced his successor, Mick Taylor, along with tunes including "Gimme Shelter" and "You Can't Always Get What You Want."

The Rolling Stones' "50 and Counting" tour continues tonight at the Honda Center in Anaheim, California.

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