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Roger Daltrey Planning Who Tour, New Collaborations

'I've always wanted to do something with Jimmy Page," Daltrey says. 'Mainly because, what the hell is he doing? What an amazing waste of a talent.'

October 1, 2010 12:27 PM ET

In an audio interview posted on the band's website (and linked to by Consequence of Sound), Roger Daltrey reveals that the Who are contemplating a tour next year. "We're in the planning stages — but we do plan on doing something," says Daltrey. "I can't really talk about the specifics yet, but it will be based on our past work." Earlier this year the Who played Quadrophenia in its entirety at the Royal Albert Hall, and Daltrey says that more shows are possible. "I would like to be on the road playing as many different kinds of show as we possibly could. Maybe we'll do Quadrophenia one night and the greatest hits the next night. Maybe Tommy, too, if I can still sing it. The audience would have to take a chance on what show they're going to get."

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The Who toured Quadrophenia in 1996 and 1997, but Daltrey says these shows would be different. "It would be the same musically, but stylistically we'd try and update it and make it a little more coherent to a newcomer to the piece," he says. "We're sixteen years older now. A lot of the energy and the macho stuff I could bring to it then I don't have anymore." Any tour would have to get the green light from Pete Townshend, who meets with Daltrey three of four times a year to discuss future projects. "He's incredible adventurous when it comes to projects and new ideas and things," says Daltrey. "When it comes to getting out there and doing it I'm more adventurous than he is. I'd like to get the boat out more than him ... He is writing [a new album] and you never know when that might turn up." If Pete decides to not tour next year, Daltrey says he'll tour Europe with his solo band. "I can't retire," he says. "I've gotta do something. If the band aren't out there, I'll be out there with my little band."

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Daltrey is also interested in working with other guitarists. "I've always wanted to do something with Jimmy Page," he says. "Mainly because, what the hell is he doing? What an amazing waste of a talent. He's a genius." Daltrey opened for Clapton on a handful of U.S. dates last year, and says he'd also like to work with him. "It would be very difficult for us to work together [onstage] because he's doing a very laid back blues show," says Daltrey. "I said to him 'it would be very interesting if we could find some songs that could dig a big deeper.' I think he needs a bit of driving, does Eric. That blues stuff is alright, but you need dynamic. Never forget dynamic. I think we could do interesting things." Daltrey said he was meeting with a guitarist later in the day to discuss a collaboration. "We're talking about maybe doing a blues album just for the fun of it and to revisit our early days," he says. "I don't want to say his name in case it doesn't happen, but he's got a band and I'll literally chose some songs from [The Who's early] period and get in there and do an album and put it out on the Internet."

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Song Stories

“Bird on a Wire”

Leonard Cohen | 1969

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