.

Rockers Send 'Love Letter' to Public Radio

Jack White, My Morning Jacket, the Roots, Phish and more celebrate Public Radio Music Month

Jim James of My Morning Jacket, Questlove of the Roots and Jack White
Scott Legato/WireImage; Johnny Nunez/WireImage; Erika Goldring/GettyImages
April 9, 2012 1:55 PM ET

A group of musicians including Jack White, My Morning Jacket, Death Cab for Cutie, MGMT, M. Ward, the Roots, Tony Bennett, John Mayer and members of Pearl Jam, Phish and Fleet Foxes have penned a "love letter" to public radio as part of Public Radio Music Month.

"Thank you for taking chances," the letter reads. "Thank you for playing our music even when – especially when – it doesn't sound like everything else on the radio dial. Thank you for inviting us into your studios and asking us intelligent questions. Thank you for introducing us to some of the most important music in our lives, music that made us who we are."

Photos: Random Notes

Other artists who signed the letter include Iron and Wine, Jakob Dylan, Chairlift, Bob Mould, Best Coast, Passion Pit, Raphael Saadiq, Shabazz Palaces, Tenacious D, Vernon Reid, the Head and the Heart, Calexico and Glen Hansard. Independent labels Sub Pop, Dead Oceans, Jagjaguwar, Secretly Canadian, and Knitting Factory Records also showed their support.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Promiscuous”

Nelly Furtado with Timbaland | 2006

This club-oriented single featuring Timbaland, who produced Nelly Furtado's third album, Loose, was Furtado’s sexy return after the Canadian singer's exploration of her Portuguese heritage on Folklore. "In the studio, initially I didn’t know if I could do it, 'cause Timbaland wrote that chorus," Furtado said. "I'm like, 'That's cool, but I don't know if I'm ready to do full-out club.'" The flirty lyrics are a dance between a guy and girl, each knowing they will end up in bed together but still playing the game. "Tim and I called it 'The BlackBerry Song,' she said, "because everything we say in the song you could text-message to somebody."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com