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Rock the Bells Cancels Rest of Tour

Traveling hip-hop festival suffered from weak ticket sales

Kid Cudi performs during the Rock the Bells Music Festival in Mountain View, California.
C Flanigan/FilmMagic
September 27, 2013 9:55 AM ET

Rock the Bells is cutting the party short. The traveling hip-hop festival has canceled its remaining dates, including stops in Washington D.C. and New York, due to weak ticket sales, promoters Guerrilla Union announced on the Rock the Bells website. "It's extremely unfortunate that we can't complete the last half of the 10th Anniversary Rock the Bells tour," said Chang Weisberg, owner of Guerilla Union. "We did everything in our power to save the show. Unfortunately, the financial loss would have been devastating."

Rock the Bells 2013: Behind the Scenes

Rock the Bells had already visited Los Angeles and San Francisco earlier this month, but seemingly couldn't build momentum for its second half. The canceled dates were scheduled for this weekend at R.F.K. Stadium in Washington D.C., and October 4th and 5th at the Meadowlands Racetrack in New York; Wu-Tang Clan, Kendrick Lamar, J. Cole, Kid Cudi and Tyler, the Creator were among those set to perform. Full refunds will be given to ticketholders at the locations of purchase.

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