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Rock Photographer Barry Feinstein Dead at Age 80

Feinstein shot album covers for Bob Dylan, George Harrison and the Rolling Stones

October 20, 2011 1:20 PM ET
Barry Feinstein photographed by Bob Dylan
Barry Feinstein photographed by Bob Dylan
©Barry Feinstein Photography

Rock & roll photographer Barry Feinstein, who shot the cover of Bob Dylan's The Times They Are A-Changin, George Harrison's All Things Must Pass, Janis Joplin's Pearl and countless other iconic works, died today in upstate New York of natural causes. He was 80.

Feinstein's photos of Bob Dylan on his legendary 1966 electric tour are some of the most famous images from the songwriter's career. He captured a gaunt, frazzled Dylan smoking a cigarette in a limousine as fans peered inside, huddled in a seat in an otherwise empty Royal Albert Hall, sitting on a stoop with children in Liverpool, England and standing on a ferry dock in Australia, a photo later used as the cover for Martin Scorsese's 2005 documentary No Direction Home

Feinstein also shot the first cover for the Rolling Stones' 1968 masterpiece Beggar's Banquet. ABKCO deemed the image of a dirty toilet in a graffiti covered bathroom too explicit for release and they replaced it with a sparse white cover – though later editions were released with Feinstein's picture. He shot the photo in a bathroom at a Porsche repair shop in Los Angeles. 

He worked in Hollywood and Washington, DC, shooting Judy Garland, Steve McQueen, Richard Nixon, John Kennedy and Frank Sinatra and many other icons of the 1960s and 1970s. Feinstein also directed the 1968 cult movie You Are What You Eat

Related
Iconic Pictures by Rock Photographer Barry Feinstein

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