.

Robin Gibb Wakes from Coma

Bee Gees singer can nod and communicate with family, rep confirms

April 21, 2012 5:21 PM ET
robin gibb
Robin Gibb performs in Potsdam, Germany.
Frank Hoensch/Getty Images

After slipping into a coma more than a week ago, the Bee Gees' Robin Gibb has regained consciousness, the BBC reports.

Gibb's representative Doug Wright confirmed to the BBC that the singer is showing signs of recovery and has been able to nod and communicate with his family.

Gibb, who is widely believed to have been diagnosed with colon and liver cancer, was hospitalized last week after contracting pneumonia.

Gibb's wife, Dwina, told her hometown paper in Ireland, the Impartial Reporterthat the family had continued to maintain a vigil around the singer's bedside and had been trying to "bring him back" by playing music and singing for him.

"His brother Barry, his wife Linda and son Stephen came over from America. Barry was singing to him. Thousands of people are saying prayers every day," she said, adding that Gibb cried when she played Roy Orbison's song "Crying" for him. 

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