.

Robert Randolph and the Family Band Rock Out With Flair on 'Lickety Split' - Album Premiere

Bandleader and pedal steel guitarist readies new LP

Robert Randolph & the Family Band
Courtesy Blue Note Records
July 9, 2013 9:00 AM ET

In "Amped Up," the first track from Robert Randolph and the Family Band's new album Lickety Split, lead vocalist and guitarist Robert Randolph sings, "Everybody throw your hands up/ C'mon get cranked up/ Everybody get amped up!" But Randolph isn't talking about energizing a crowd through bombastic, overproduced pop; the pedal steel guitarist (who was named one of Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Guitarists) espouses bluesy rock similar to Earth, Wind and Fire. Randolph's sprawling, sacred steel solos feature prominently on the album and his talented bandmates add fire – especially backing vocalist Lenesha Randolph, whose harmonious singing accentuates Randolph's soulful croon.

Random Notes: Hottest Rock Pictures

On the LP, the band get some help from guitar legend Carlos Santana ("Brand New Wayo," "Blacky Joe"). Known for their jubilant, foot-stomping performances at such festivals as Bonnaroo and SXSW, Robert Randolph and the Family Band even manage to transcend their sunny, gospel tracks ("New Orleans," "Born Again") to take on the one percent ("Lickety Split") and the anguish of returning war veterans ("Welcome Home").   

Lickety Split will be released on July 16th, but you can stream it exclusively here and preorder it on iTunes.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Nightshift”

The Commodores | 1984

The year after soul legends Marvin Gaye and Jackie Wilson died, songwriter Dennis Lambert asked members of the Commodores to give him a tape of ideas. "And the one from Walter Orange has this wonderful bass line," said co-writer Franne Golde. "Plus the lyric, 'Marvin, he was a friend of mine' ... Within 10 minutes, we had decided it should be something like a modern R&B version of 'Rock 'n' Roll Heaven,' and I just said, 'Nightshift.'" This tribute to the recently deceased musicians was the band's only hit without Lionel Richie, who had left for a solo career.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com