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Robert Plant Joins Twitter, Revamps Online Presence

Led Zeppelin frontman starts Instagram, Google Plus accounts and relaunches official site

Robert Plant performs in Byron Bay, Australia.
Matt Roberts/Getty Images
August 8, 2013 11:55 AM ET

Robert Plant has officially entered the digital age. The Led Zeppelin singer has started accounts on Twitter, Instagram and Google Plus alongside a redesign of his website, which also features some fresh, exclusive material.

Plant's first 25,000 Twitter followers were rewarded for their online loyalty with an exclusive free download of the rocker's current group, Robert Plant Presents the Sensational Space Shifters, covering Led Zeppelin's "What Is and What Should Never Be" live.

100 Greatest Singers: Robert Plant

Plant will be using his website to unveil new multimedia projects, like an upcoming 10-part documentary series on his trip to Mali. It'll also serve as a venue to share archived interviews, photos, set lists and more.

His new Internet presence comes with a likely caveat, though: Fans can now hound him harder about his hints that he's open to a Led Zeppelin reunion next year.

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