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Rick Ross Issues Official Apology for 'Rape' Lyrics

'My choice of words was not only offensive, it does not reflect my true heart,' says rapper

April 12, 2013 4:40 PM ET
Rick Ross performs in Austin, Texas.
Rick Ross performs in Austin, Texas.
Gary Miller/FilmMagic

Rick Ross has issued an official apology over lyrics that seemed to celebrate rape in his new song "U.O.E.N.O."

"Most recently, my choice of words was not only offensive, it does not reflect my true heart," Ross wrote in a statement reported by Billboard. "And for this, I apologize." The Miami rapper also apologized to fans, to women who have "felt the sting of abuse" and to young men for setting a regrettable example.

Rick Ross Loses Reebok Endorsement Over 'Rape' Lyrics

Ross came under fire late last month for the "U.O.E.N.O." lyrics, "Put molly all in her champagne/ She ain't even know it / I took her home and I enjoyed that/ She ain't even know it." He repeatedly tried to apologize, but called the lyrics a "misunderstanding" and a "misinterpretation." The lines were then removed from the song, and Reebok dropped him from their endorsement deal yesterday. Full text of Ross' statement follows below.

Before I am an artist, I am a father, a son, and a brother to some of the most cherished women in the world. So for me to suggest in any way that harm and violation be brought to a woman is one of my biggest mistakes and regrets. As an artist, one of the most liberating things is being able to paint pictures with my words. But with that comes a great responsibility. And most recently, my choice of words was not only offensive, it does not reflect my true heart. And for this, I apologize. To every woman that has felt the sting of abuse, I apologize. I recognize that as an artist I have a voice and with that, the power of influence. To the young men who listen to my music, please know that using a substance to rob a woman of her right to make a choice is not only a crime, it's wrong and I do not encourage it. To my fans, I also apologize if I have disappointed you. I can only hope that this sparks a healthy dialogue and that I can contribute to it.

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