.

Report: Billy Corgan Making Pro Wrestling Reality Show

'We just signed with a big reality show producer,' he says

June 5, 2012 11:50 AM ET
Billy Corgan
Billy Corgan performs at La Riviera in Madrid, Spain.
Juan Naharro Gimenez/Getty Images

Billy Corgan is reportedly pursuing his interest in making a pro wrestling reality show, according to ProWrestling.net. The Smashing Pumpkins frontman's love for pro wrestling is well known, and he has started a new wrestling company called Resistance Pro. Speaking to Major League Wrestling Radio, Corgan made clear that he's trying to document his experiences running the organization, and that he's intent on getting the series to TV.

"I'm doing a lot of behind-the-scenes stuff. We're trying to get a reality show made," said Corgan. "We just signed a deal with a big reality show producer. A guy with an incredible track record. We're in good hands." Corgan revealed he's had "like nine or ten meetings" thus far, and that he hopes to give a look into the independent wrestling world by highlighting "the struggles independent wrestlers go through to try to find work."

The Smashing Pumpkins' upcoming album, Oceania, is scheduled for a June 19th release.

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