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Reggae Star Buju Banton Convicted on Cocaine Charges

Singer will serve at least 15 years for attemping to possess and distribute cocaine

February 23, 2011 10:30 AM ET
Buju Banton
Buju Banton
Soul Brother/FilmMagic

Reggae star Buju Banton has been convicted by a Florida court for attempting to possess and distribute cocaine in 2009. The singer has yet to be sentenced, but faces at least 15 years in prison. In addition to the conspiracy charge, Banton was also found guilty of another drug trafficking offense and a gun charge.

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Banton was busted by an informant working for the Drug Enforcement Administration. The singer told the informant he could broker the drug, though he later testified that he was just boasting. Nevertheless, video and audio recordings made by the informant, including a video in which Banton appeared to be testing cocaine in a Florida warehouse, convinced the jury that he was indeed guilty.

Photos: Random Notes

Earlier this month, Banton's most recent record Before the Dawn won Best Reggae Album for at the Grammy Awards. Given the lengthy jail time ahead of the singer, it may be his last release for some time.

Buju Banton convicted in Florida drug conspiracy case [BBC]

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