.

Recording Academy Reponds to Steve Stoute's Criticism of Grammys

NARAS president pledges to improve diversity in voting body

March 4, 2011 2:45 PM ET
 Eminem attends The 53rd Annual GRAMMY Awards held at Staples Center on February 13, 2011 in Los Angeles, California.
Eminem attends The 53rd Annual GRAMMY Awards held at Staples Center on February 13, 2011 in Los Angeles, California.
Lester Cohen/WireImage

The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences finally responded to music mogul Steve Stoute's recent full-page ad in the New York Times criticizing the Grammys for losing touch with popular culture by failing to honor artists such as Eminem, Kanye West and Justin Bieber. In a joint statement signed by Stoute and NARAS president Neil Portnow, the two announced that they have agreed to talks about how the Recording Academy can "evolve in an ever-changing cultural environment."

Grammy Awards 2011: Complete Coverage

The statement is a bit vague, but promises to revise the Grammys' nominating and voting process in order to "actively incorporate generational and artistic diversity." Reading between the lines, this seems to mean that the Academy will be doing its best to balance out its voting body to even out what could be understood as a bias against hip-hop and chart pop among its older members.

Recording Academy Responds to a Critic [NY Times]

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Vans”

The Pack | 2006

Berkeley, California rappers the Pack made their footwear choice clear in 2006 with the song "Vans." The track caught the attention of Too $hort, who signed them to his imprint. MTV refused to play the video for the song, though, claiming it was essentially a commercial for the product. Rapper Lil' B disagreed. "I didn’t know nobody [at] Vans," he said. "I was just a rapper who wore Vans." Even without MTV's support, Lil' B recognized the impact of the track. "God blessed me with such a revolutionary song… People around my age know who really started a lot of the dressing people are into now."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com