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Record Shopping With Florence and the Machine

April 27, 2010 4:37 PM ET

When she dropped into New York in early April, singer Florence Welch of Florence and the Machine invited Rolling Stone to tag along for an epic record-shopping excursion. On her killer debut album Lungs, Welch delivers piano-pop anthems with an arty, avant-garde bent, so it made sense to head over to Other Music, the independently owned shop that specializes in more obscure, left-of-center records.

Welch managed to find plenty to purchase, including new records from her favorite acts Goldfrapp, Holly Miranda and Liars. Her grand total? Fifty-five bucks. Welch also revisited some of her old favorites and told RS about the impact those records had on her life and work. While eyeing a deluxe edition box set of the Beatles' Abbey Road, Welch said, "This is the first Beatles album I ever heard. And I loved it! For some strange reason I was really anti-Beatles. My step-dad was into the Beatles and my dad was into the Stones. So I was always in the Stones camp, until someone gave me [Abbey Road] for Christmas." Watch the full clip above.

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Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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