Read Kesha's Full Injunction Request Against Dr. Luke

94-page document provides step-by-step look into singer's denied attempt to be liberated from contract

Read the full injunction transcript from Kesha's denied attempt to liberate herself from Dr. Luke and Sony Music Credit: Mary Altaffer/AP

On February 19th, a New York judge denied Kesha's attempt for an injunction against Lukasz "Dr. Luke" Gottwald in the singer's ongoing legal battle against the producer, who she claimed raped and abused her. Kesha's injunction would have allowed her to record new music outside of Dr. Luke's Kemosabe Records, which lies under the Sony Music umbrella. However, the judge sided with Dr. Luke and Sony in the case, and Kesha was forced to honor her contract with Dr. Luke's Kemosabe Records.

Rolling Stone has obtained the complete 94-page testimony from that injunction hearing, with New York Supreme Court Justice Shirley Kornreich hearing arguments from Kesha's lawyer Mark Geragos as well as lawyers for both Dr. Luke and Sony Music.

Following the judge's decision, many of Kesha's fellow artists – Lady Gaga, Taylor Swift, Adele and many more – rallied around the singer, who has argued that she's being forced by the law to continue working with her rapist. Dr. Luke has denied all charges.

"All I ever wanted was to be able to make music without being afraid, scared, or abused," Kesha wrote in a statement earlier this week. "This case has never been about a renegotiation of my record contract – it was never about getting a bigger, or a better, deal. This is about being free from my abuser. I would be willing to work with Sony if they do the right thing and break all ties that bind me to my abuser."

On Thursday, Sony Music said they were "not in a position to terminate the contractual relationship between Luke and Kesha" because Kesha's deal is with Kasz Money, Gottwald's company that has a separate deal with Sony's RCA/Jive subsidiary. "Sony is doing everything it can to support the artist in these circumstances, but is legally unable to terminate the contract to which it is not a party," said Scott Edelman, a lawyer representing Sony Music.