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Rare Tim Buckley Live LP With Unreleased Songs Due in August

May 29, 2009 4:02 PM ET

Nearly 34 years after his tragic death, a live recording of folk legend Tim Buckley will finally reach fans' ears when Live at the Folklore Center, NYC - March 6th, 1967 is released on August 25th on NYC's Tompkins Square label. Buckley's performance at the Folklore Center — a gig attended by only 35 people that was thankfully recorded by folk impresario Izzy Young — will be presented in its original running order. The set will also include an unpublished interview with Buckley by Young.

Featuring mostly tracks off Buckley's 1966 self-titled debut and his 1967 follow-up Goodbye and Hello, the live recording also contains six Buckley compositions that have never before been released on any studio or live album: "Just Please Leave Me," "What Do You Do (He Never Saw You)," "If The Rain Comes," "Cripples Cry," "Country Boy" and "I Can't Leave You Loving Me."

After releasing nine albums ranging from folk to avant-garde over the course of nine years, Buckley died of a heroin overdose in 1975 at the age of 28. Buckley's son Jeff went on to become an acclaimed singer-songwriter in his own right, releasing the classic album Grace in 1994. Like his father, Jeff Buckley died too young, passing away the age of 30 after an accidental drowning on May 29th, 1997, 12 years ago today. (Look back at artists who died young.) A collection of Jeff Buckley's live work, titled Grace Around the World will also be released soon.

The track list for Live at the Folklore Center, NYC - March 6th, 1967:

1. "Song for Jainie"
2. "I Never Asked to Be Your Mountain"
3. "Wings"
4. "Phantasmagoria in Two"
5. "Just Please Leave Me"
6. "Dolphins"
7. "I Can't See You"
8. "Troubadour"
9. "Aren't You The Girl"
10. "What Do You Do (He Never Saw You)"
11.  "No Man Can Find The War"
12. "Carnival Song"
13. "Cripples Cry"
14. "If the Rain Comes"
15. "Country Boy"
16. "I Can't Leave You Loving Me"

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