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Radiohead Give Fans A Treat

August 30, 1997 12:00 AM ET

Coming off a hugely successful U.S. tour, one would think that Radiohead would settle down and take a break ... but not the energetic band from Oxford, England. Not only did they perform on "Late Show With David Letterman" Friday night, but they are now on their way back to the U.K. to start a tour there.

Kicking off the English stint, Radiohead will treat members of their fan club to a special, secret show Sept. 3 at the London club Astoria, according to the British music weekly NME. Ed O'Brien, the band's guitarist, told NME that this show will be totally unlike any other show they've played in the past, because they'll be able to be as obscure as they want. Their set will highlight mostly B-sides, including "Meeting in the Aisle," an instrumental on the flipside of "Karma Police." O'Brien said that while this show could fall back on them, at least they'll be among friends.

Radiohead will tour Japan in January, and since they've been writing material while on tour in the U.S., they then plan to head back into the studio to work on their fourth album.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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