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Radiohead Develop Sense of Humor for 'South Park'

Producer Matt Stone tells frontman Thom Yorke to put more emotion into his voice-over

August 16, 2001
Radiohead, Radio head, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood, Colin Greenwood, Phil Selway, Ed O'Brien, Creep, Grammy, Rollingstone, archive, magazine
Thom Yorke from the band "Radiohead" arrives onstage June 29th, 2001 at the Santa Barbara Bowl, California.
Lucy Nicholson/Getty

"Radiohead called us up because there were planning a big show in Oxford," says South Park co-honcho Matt Stone. "The venue was called South Park, so we made up some T-shirts for them. Then they brought up that they wanted to do voices for the show. I asked them, 'Are you sure you want to sully your well-deserved artistic reputation by associating yourselves with our crappy little show?' And they said, 'Sure.'" All five Heads recorded their South Park lines before a recent concert in Santa Barbara, California. "When you do voice-overs," says Stone, "you need to overact and overemote to make it work. It was funny to sit in a studio with Thom Yorke, a brilliant performer who opens his heart night after night, and say, 'Yo, Thom. Put some emotion into it.' I felt like a real shithead."

This story is from the August 16th, 2001 issue of Rolling Stone. 


To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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