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R. Kelly Wins $3.4 Million Back Pay Settlement Against Tour Promoter

October 7, 2008 10:55 AM ET

R. Kelly was awarded $3.4 million in back pay from his most recent tour after the tour's promoter "swindled" Kelly and others involved. Kelly's legal dispute with promoter Rowe Entertainment dates back to February, while Kelly was still on the road. Leonard Rowe was accused of selling shares of Kelly concerts in exchange for cash investments, but then falsely told the investors that the concerts lost money. "I agreed to let Leonard Rowe promote my tour because he convinced me he was an underdog who deserved a chance to prove himself. Like the saying goes, 'No good deed goes unpunished,'" Kelly said in a statement. "I have complete sympathy for all the good people who were swindled by Rowe, and I will do everything I can to help them get their money back from him."

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Q&A: R. Kelly

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Song Stories

“Nightshift”

The Commodores | 1984

The year after soul legends Marvin Gaye and Jackie Wilson died, songwriter Dennis Lambert asked members of the Commodores to give him a tape of ideas. "And the one from Walter Orange has this wonderful bass line," said co-writer Franne Golde. "Plus the lyric, 'Marvin, he was a friend of mine' ... Within 10 minutes, we had decided it should be something like a modern R&B version of 'Rock 'n' Roll Heaven,' and I just said, 'Nightshift.'" This tribute to the recently deceased musicians was the band's only hit without Lionel Richie, who had left for a solo career.

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