.

R. Kelly 'Amazed' With His Lady Gaga Collaboration

R&B singer dishes on his contribution to 'Artpop'

November 14, 2013 11:15 AM ET
R. Kelly performs in Chicago
R. Kelly performs in Chicago.
Daniel Boczarski/Redferns via Getty Images

Although R.Kelly still has a few weeks before dropping his new album, Black Panties, the R&B singer has recently been on many minds due to his collaboration with Lady Gaga on the Artpop song "Do What U Want." Producer DJ White Shadow told Rolling Stone earlier this week that he hooked up the two stars over the phone.

Lady Gaga's 'Artpop': The Rolling Stone Review 

The song's a synth-y celebration in which Gaga and Kelly muse over club life and love, but mainly insist that you can do "whatever you want with my body." So what did R. Kelly think of the end result? "I felt that it was somewhat of a sexual song, but on a classy tip, you know?" he tells Rolling Stone. "Because I have a lot of sexual classics myself. But this, it had a rock funkiness, and somehow, magically, an R&B-ish feel to it. I was just amazed by it." 

As one might suspect with lyrics like that, Kelly is already reaping the rewards of hopping onto a hot Gaga track, particularly when he's out clubbing himself. Asked if women are coming up to him and repeating the titular line, he replies simply, "In more ways the one. All the time." 

Black Panties is due out December 10th. 

Additional reporting by Mike Ayers.

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