.

R.E.M. Issue Cease and Desist to Fox News

'We have little or no respect for their puff adder brand of reportage'

September 7, 2012 1:35 PM ET
Michael Stipe
Michael Stipe
Jim Spellman/Getty Images

R.E.M. have issued a cease and desist order against Fox News, after the right-wing cable news network played "Losing My Religion" during its coverage of the Democratic National Convention.

"We have little or no respect for their puff adder brand of reportage. Our music does not belong there," said Michael Stipe, in a statement posted on R.E.M.'s website.

The band sent the cease and desist through its publisher, Warner-Tamerlane Music, demanding that Fox News stop "its unlicensed and unauthorized use of the song."

Just last week, Stipe co-wrote a letter with writer-director Tom Gilroy slamming Republicans as part of the 90 Days, 90 Reasons project. "The current Republican platform seeks the opposite of democracy," reads the letter. "It seeks to create a permanent aristocracy – an entitled gentry that has greater access to this dream than most of the rest of America."

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