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Musicians pay tribute to Beastie Boys' Adam Yauch

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Santigold, via a statement:
"Though I've been a fan of The Beastie Boys since I was 12 years old  (there is a lost tape of me performing "Fight for Your Right to Party" with my friends at the mall), I got to know Adam when I had the opportunity to work with The Beastie Boys on the song "Don't Play No Game That I Can't Win" for the Hot Sauce Committee Part Two album. Adam was what I call an instant friend. He was someone whose warmth, honesty and generosity were felt immediately. As an artist, he is a legend. He is the kind of artist I've always aspired to be like; he was the epitome of a new kind of cool, he was hilarious, a visionary, talented on so many different levels from music to film, he was socially conscious, spiritually aware, an activist, and he was always humble and down to earth. It was such an honor to have known him, and I will miss him. This is such a monumental loss, not just for the music and film communities, but for the whole world. "

Nas, via a statement:
"One of my greatest moments in music was when I worked with the Beastie Boys ... Now today I'm hearing our brother is gone. I prayed this would not happen ... MCA was so cool, man. We had great talks about what it was like for them in the beginning, getting into the rap game. I'll never forget that experience for the rest of my life. MCA is true legend who influenced me. God bless his soul and his loved ones."

President of Def Jam Recordings Joie Manda, via a statement:
"It's impossible to measure the influence Adam Yauch and The Beastie Boys have had on me personally, on hip-hop culture as a whole, and on rock and roll in general. His legacy here at Def Jam is nothing short of iconic - he was one of the pioneering artists of this great label and family. We are filled with a sense of loss today... the Def Jam flag is at half mast. Our heartfelt condolences go out to his family and loved ones."

Neil Portnow, President/CEO of the Recording Academy
"As a co-founding member of the three-time Grammy-winning Beastie Boys, Adam Yauch was part of one of the most groundbreaking trios in hip-hop. The group's music crossed genres and color lines, and helped bring rap to a wider audience. A rapper, musician and director, Yauch was an immense talent and creative visionary, and an instrumental force in the group's career for more than three decades. In addition to his music and artistry, he was a philanthropist who devoted much of his energy to his passionate support for freedom of expression. The music world has lost a true trailblazer, and our deepest sympathies are with his family, friends and fans throughout the world."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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