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Queens of the Stone Age Continue Creepy Cartoons in 'My God Is the Sun'

Latest entry in band's spooky series brings back familiar characters

May 17, 2013 2:40 PM ET
Josh Homme of Queens of the Stone Age performs in Glastonbury, England.
Josh Homme of Queens of the Stone Age performs in Glastonbury, England.
Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage

Queens of the Stone Age's new video for "My God Is the Sun" continues the band's barrage of creepy animated clips in advance of their new album, ...Like Clockwork.

Whereas the previous clips for "I Appear Missing," "If I Had a Tail" and "Keep Your Eyes Peeled" offered only portions of the album cuts, "My God Is the Sun" gives us the whole shebang, in all its gory glory.

The video wraps up the demented storyline that started with "Missing," bringing back familiar characters from that hellscape, then unites them with a giant, winged skull with a gold tooth and some serious Ghostbusters powers.

Like other entries in the series, the video for "My God Is the Sun" was animated by Liam Brazier and based on characters created by the UK artist Boneface, who also designed the album's cover. ...Like Clockwork is out June 4th on Matador.

Catch QOTSA's previous creepy clips here:





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