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Quadron Worship Michael Jackson With 'Neverland' - Song Premiere

Soulful duo pay tribute to one of their favorite artists

May 27, 2013 9:00 AM ET
Quadron
Quadron
Eliot Lee Hazel

Quadron looked to honor Michael Jackson in their new song "Neverland," but the soulful duo wanted to put a fresh perspective on their tribute track. "[Singer Coco O. and I] are both huge fans of Michael Jackson and we wanted to write a song about that, but from a different angle," multi-instrumentalist and producer Robin Hannibal tells Rolling Stone. "We created a third-person story about when people become impersonators to pay tribute to artists that are their idols because they are so obsessed with them."

Listen: Clips from 'The Great Gatsby' Soundtrack feat. Quadron, Jack White, Jack White, Florence and the Machine

The Los Angeles-based duo then dipped into vintage sounds for "Neverland," wrapping Coco O.'s fleet vocals around Hannibal's horns and strings on the sensual, syncopated crawl. "What better way than to tell that story on a track that draws inspiration from the mid/late Seventies," Hannibal says. "The last line of the lyrics are 'We'll meet in Neverland,' which serves as symbolism for both MJ's ranch but also the utopia and dream world that it represents."

"Neverland" will be on Quadron's next album, Avalanche, out June 4th.

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