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Pukkelpop Cancelled as Death Toll Rises to Five

Over 70 injured after storm hit Belgian festival

August 19, 2011 9:00 AM ET
pukkelpop death stage collapse
Damages caused by the storm at the Pukkelpop Music Festival.
PINO MISURACA/AFP/Getty Images

The death toll at the Pukkelpop Festival in Belgium has risen to five following a heavy storm that ravaged video screens, tents and a stage at the event yesterday. In addition to the five dead, eight other concertgoers have been seriously wounded and 65 others have minor injuries.

Pukkelpop organizers have elected to cancel the remainder of the festival, which was to include performances by Eminem, the Offspring, the Kills, Lykke Li, the Deftones, Wild Beasts, Odd Future the Twilight Singers and many others.

In a translation of a statement on the Pukkelpop site, organizers said that the sudden, severe storm was "very unpredictable" and that they are "very touched by all the spontaneous help that our festival goers and we received."

Related
At Least Three Dead in Belgian Stage Collapse
Stage Collapse at Indiana State Fair Kills Five, Injures Dozens
Indiana Stage Collapse Tragedy Was Preventable, Expert Says
Video: Flaming Lips' Stage Collapses in Oklahoma
Cheap Trick Survives Stage Collapse in Canada
Cheap Trick Manager: 'I Can't Believe We're Alive'

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