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Promoter: We Had No Plans to Cancel Michael Jackson Shows

Defense asserts that singer's anxiety led to drug overdose

October 26, 2011 8:05 AM ET
Conrad Murray (R), the former personal physician of the late singer Michael Jackson, sits with his attorney J. Michael Flanagan
Conrad Murray (R), the former personal physician of the late singer Michael Jackson, sits with his attorney J. Michael Flanagan
Paul Buck-Pool/Getty Images

Randy Phillips, the president and CEO of AEG Live, revealed in testimony at the trial of Michael Jackson's physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, yesterday that the company had no plans to cancel or postpone the singer's scheduled concert dates in London, despite the fact that the singer missed rehearsals and seemed unprepared to perform in the weeks leading up to his death in 2009. Phillips made it clear that his company's contract with the singer would have made it very difficult to pull the plug on the shows.

Murray's attorneys have been trying to make the case that the King of Pop was anxious about the gigs, which fed into an anxiety they say led him to take the overdose of sedatives that caused his death.

Related
Timeline: The Trial of Dr. Conrad Murray
Photos: Michael Jackson Remembered
Photos: Michael Jackson's Funeral

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