.

Police Raid Jackson Ranch

Officers search pop singer's house

November 18, 2003 12:00 AM ET

Dozens of Santa Barbara County sheriff's deputies armed with warrants swarmed Michael Jackson's Neverland Valley ranch Tuesday morning to search the compound. The officers arrived at the gated ranch at 8:30 a.m. to conduct the searches, which are part of an ongoing investigation, Sgt. Chris Pappas said in a statement.

CourtTV reported that the raid was tied to allegations made by an unnamed twelve-year-old boy, though authorities would not comment on those reports. Jackson's spokesperson could not be reached for comment.

The raid came on the same day that Jackson's Number Ones greatest hits album was released. The collection features the new song "One More Chance," written by R. Kelly. A Jackson TV special is scheduled to air on CBS on November 26th.

Jackson and his three children were not at Neverland during the raid because he has been in Las Vegas for three weeks filming footage for the TV special.

In 1993, a fourteen-year-old boy alleged that Jackson had improper sexual contact with him; that case was settled out of court for an undisclosed amount.

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