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Pixies Return to the Stage at Isle of Wight Festival

June 15, 2009 10:03 AM ET

Pixies took the stage at the Isle of Wight festival last night, marking their first gig since wrapping up their 2004 reunion tour and its subsequent festival gigs in 2007. Frank Black, Kim Deal, Joey Santiago and David Lovering treated the crowd to a nearly hour-and-a-half greatest-hits set that kicked off with "U-Mass" and featured "Debaser," "Gouge Away" and "Gigantic" along with their cover of the Jesus and Mary Chain's "Head On" and their version of Neil Young's "Winterlong" (Young took the stage next).

According to the NME, the show went off without a hitch, save for a moment when Black and Deal laughed off a mistake that ended "In Heaven (Lady in the Radiator Song)" early. After Deal told Black he was supposed to scream on the track, he replied, "I haven't screamed since about 1989" and the band cracked up. The set ended with an aptly named song: B side "Into the White." Also today, Pitchfork has a first look at the packaging for Pixies box set Minotaur.

Related Stories:

Kim Deal Says No New Pixies Album "Because I Don't Want To"
Pixies' Frank Black Readies Tour With New Band Grand Duchy

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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