Pink Floyd to Issue Extravagant 'Division Bell' Anniversary Box Set

The group has also released a brand new music video for the instrumental cut 'Marooned'

Pink Floyd Division Bell David Gilmour
Tim Hall/Redferns
David Gilmour
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Pink Floyd will reissue their last album, 1994's The Division Bell, on July 1st as a massive collector's box set and vinyl release in celebration of the record's 20th anniversary.

Find Out Where 'Rolling Stone' Readers Ranked 'The Division Bell' on Our Poll of Pink Floyd's Best Albums

The set boasts a two-LP, 180-gram vinyl edition of the album, remastered from the original analog tapes by Doug Sax and filled with all the original full-length tracks, which were initially shortened to fit on a single LP. The vinyl will also be available as a separate purchase from the box set.

The box set also includes a version of the album mixed in 5.1 surround sound on a Blu-Ray disc that also contains an HD stereo mix of the album and a brand new video for "Marooned." Directed by Aubrey Powell, the clip opens with digital footage of an ostensibly abandoned space station, before returning to Earth where the camera follows a man as he runs through ruins, which still bear markers of the Soviet Union. The clip was shot in Ukraine during the first week of April, and is streaming below.

The rest of the six disc set will include a CD of the 2011 Discovery version of The Division Bell, plus three replica colored vinyl: A red 7-inch single for "Take it Back" with a live rendition of "Astronomy Domine" on the B side; a clear 7-inch with edits of "High Hopes" and "Keep Talking"; and a blue 12-inch disc with the full versions of "High Hopes" and "Keep Talking," plus a live version of "One of These Days" (the flip side of that last disc also features a laser-etched design).

To top it off, the set will come with five collector' art prints designed by Hipgnosis/StormStudios, who also designed the 180-gram LP's gatefold sleeve.

The Division Bell was the second record Pink Floyd released, following the departure of vocalist-bassist Roger Waters. Leading up to the release of its predacessor, 1987's A Momentary Lapse of Reason, Waters engaged his former bandmates in extensive legal proceedings over the band's name, rights that eventually went to vocalist-guitarist David Gilmour. In 2013, Waters expressed remorse over the legal battle of the band name. "I was wrong," he said in an interview with the BBC. "Of course I was. Who cares?"