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Phil Spector Requests Appeal From U.S. Supreme Court

Producer's attorneys hope to overrule his murder conviction

December 16, 2011 8:35 AM ET
Phil Spector listens to the judge during sentencing in Los Angeles Criminal Courts.
Phil Spector listens to the judge during sentencing in Los Angeles Criminal Courts.
Jae C. Hong-Pool/Getty Images

Phil Spector's lawyers have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review his murder conviction, arguing that his constitutional rights were violated by the trial judge. According to attorney Dennis Riordan, Superior Court Judge Larry Paul Fidler became a witness for the prosecution by offering his opinion on an expert's testimony during the trial.

Spector, who is currently serving 19 years to life in prison for the 2003 murder of actress Lana Clarkson in his Los Angeles mansion, has failed in previous attempts to overturn Judge Fidler's ruling. The California Supreme Court shot down an appeal on the decision twice over earlier this year.

The legendary record producer's attorneys ultimately hope to obtain a third trial for their client. His first trial, back in 2007, was declared a mistrial after jurors deadlocked.

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