.

Peter Jones, Drummer for Crowded House, Dead at 45

Musician had been battling brain cancer

Peter Jones and Crowded House in 1996
Patrick Ford/Redferns
May 20, 2012 5:36 PM ET

Peter Jones, who played drums for Crowded House, died on Friday at the age of 45. Australia's Herald Sun newspaper reports that he had been suffering from brain cancer.

The band left a statement on its website confirming Jones' passing:

"We are in mourning today for the death of Peter Jones. We remember him as a warm hearted, funny and talented man, who was a valuable member of Crowded House. He played with style and spirit. We salute him and send our love and best thoughts to his family and friends."

Jones was born in Liverpool. He had worked as a school teacher and played drums as a session musician with bands like Harem Scarem, Deadstar and Stove Top. In 1994, he joined Crowded House, replacing founding drummer Paul Hester, and played on the live concert CD Farewell to the World. The band, whose hits include "Don't Dream It's Over" and "Something So Strong" broke up two years later. Although Crowded House reunited in 2007, Jones did not join them.

Crowded House Frontman Neil Finn, who founded the band in 1985, paid tribute to the late drummer on Twitter:

"I am very sad to hear tonight that Peter Jones has died. A Great man and a wonderful drummer. RIP Pete." 

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