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Pete Wentz Hints at End of Fall Out Boy in Blog, Twitter Posts

February 2, 2010 12:00 AM ET

A barrage of blog posts and Twitter messages from Pete Wentz have many fans concerned that Fall Out Boy might be breaking up. "I don't know the future of Fall Out Boy. It's embarrassing to say one thing and then have the future dictate another. As far as I know Fall Out Boy is on break," Wentz wrote on his A Homeboy's Life blog. "As much as I don't have a solo project, I also can't predict that I'd ever play in Fall Out Boy again."

When Rolling Stone spoke to Wentz late last year after the Folie a Deux band revealed they were taking some time off, Wentz all but guaranteed Fall Out Boy would reconvene eventually. "We've been seven years straight of just driving albums and tour, tour, tour. Everybody just needs to decompress, and the problem is that people want to know the amount of time that's gonna take, or what’s going to have to happen for it to come back." Wentz said, reiterating that the band was not breaking up for good. "It's kind of like in the Midwest, when you start having snow days. The snow will melt one day. It will melt sooner rather than later." However, Wentz's recent comments have fans wondering if the thaw will come at all.

Fall Out Boy's Patrick Stump revealed on his own Website that he's in the process of writing, recording and playing all the instruments on his solo album, while FOB guitarist Joe Trohman and drummer Andy Hurley announced a new band called the Damned Things with members of Every Time I Die and Anthrax. In another blog post, Wentz says that while he's been writing songs with Mark Hoppus, he's ultimately looking for the "right magnet" to pull him back into making music. "Letting go of this giant part of my life has been hard, Wentz wrote. "But I am convinced I will find something new that sparks me in a similar way. This is not a vacation." So is this the end of Fall Out Boy, or an emo blogging meltdown? Time will tell. In the meantime, read Wentz's full blog post below:

"i dont know the future of fall out boy. its embarrassing to say one thing and then have the future dictate another. as far as i know fall out boy is on break. (no one wants to say the “h” word). as much as i dont have a solo project, i also cant predict that id ever play in fall out boy again. not due to personal relationships as much as a band we grew apart. in this statement id like to include there is the possibility that fob will play again with out me or i will be a part of it when everyone is on the same page. it is no ones fault and there is no animosity about the decision. i felt as fans you deserve to know. there is no singular reason for this. the side projects or bands are supported by all members of the band. i am the single biggest fan of fob and if this is our legacy than so be it. i am proud of it."

UPDATE: In an interview with Spin.com, Patrick Stump said in response to Wentz's comments, "I'm not in Fall Out Boy right now. But one way or another, the band will always be around. Steven Tyler isn't in Aerosmith anymore, but his gravestone will probably say something about Aerosmith. Whether we play again or not, I don't know. If we do, it will be for the right reasons. If we don't, it will also be for the right reasons."

Related Stories:
Pete Wentz on the Art of Rocking in Underwear, Fall Out Boy's Plans
Fall Out Boy, Anthrax Members Unite in The Damned Things

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