.

Pearl Jam Set Sales Record with 'Vs.'

The Seattlites' sophomore album knocks Guns 'N Roses off the top of the first-week sales ranking

December 9, 1993
Pearl Jam Set Sales Record with 'Vs.'

Vs., the highly anticipated sophomore LP by Seattle's pride and joy Pearl Jam debuted at No. 1 and set a U.S. sales record during its first week of release, remarkable without the benefit of a video or radio single.

According to a Soundscan tally, the album sold 950,378 units in the first seven days following its Oct. 19 store date, easily smashing the previous opening week sales record of 770,000, held since 1991 by Guns n' Roses' Use Your Illusion II.

This season's other hotly anticipated follow-up release, Nirvana's In Utero, sold only 180,000 during its first week. According to Camelot Music vice president of purchasing, Lew Garrett, Camelot's 370 stores nationwide set a one-day record of 32,000 units sold and had moved nearly 100,000 units – three times the expected total for a hot release – by week's end.

As for a video, the band has so far left the record label in the dark about its intentions. While a source at Epic says the song "Go" is a likely first candidate, a spokesman at Pearl Jam's management company, Curtis Management in Seattle, says, "The band is not into the whole video thing."

This story is from the December 9th, 1993 issue of Rolling Stone.


To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com